Mason County Community Website

Discover things to help with a visit in Mason County, Washington.

Explore our collection of informative links and other content to help you get to know Mason County, Washington.

  • high steel bridge

    Me on the High Steel Bridge,Mason County.
    51 Views
  • Mason County's New Transit-Community Center

    Once again Mason Transit Authority is taking the industry lead in public transportation with their first-in-the-nation Transit-Community Center. Combining a transit hub with a center devoted to community activities, events, education and youth programs, along with retail business and nonprofit services, this innovative approach includes retrofitting a defunct 1950s-era National Guard armory, and is expected to revitalize several blocks in downtown, Shelton, WA, county seat for Mason County.
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  • Spencer Lake, Lakefront home for sale, Washington State, USA

    Beautiful timber-frame style home for sale on Spencer Lake, near Shelton, Mason County, Washington. This new home is loaded with top quality upgrades and sits on it's own private point. Visit: www.nwwf.com/key/spencer-lake.cfm
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  • Trip to the Vance Creek Bridge and the High Steel bridge, Mason County, Wa, USA.

    The Bridges of Mason County, State Washington: the Vance Creek Bridge and the High Steel Bridge.

    IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Vance Creek Bridge is officially closed to the public. Visitors will be ticketed for trespassing.

    Less than a two hour drive from Seattle, nestled in old growth forest of the southeast corner of Washington's Olympic Peninsula, you can check out two old bridges: the Vance Creek Railway Bridge and the High Steel Bridge. Both bridges were built in 1929 by the Simpson Logging Company. They helped timber companies gain access to some of the best logging in America. Towering old growth forests once stood on the other side of the steep hills of the southern Olympic Peninsula and the bridges allowed for quick work of the once pristine forests. Once the logging industry started declining in the 1970's, the Vance Creek Bridge was abandoned and eventually forgotten. The High steel bridge is now in use as a single lane vehicle bridge.
    The Vance Creek Bridge is the second tallest railway trestle in America. And it is still a sight to behold. It was 347 feet over a part of the Skokomish River and spanned 422 feet across it.
    Today the Vance Creek Bridge is a popular place for hikers and thrillseekers. Although it's technically located on private property, that hasn't stopped curiosity-seekers to visit, even though walking across the bridge is pretty damn dangerous. The railway ties range from four inches apart to as much as a foot, so it's not the safest bridge to span.
    Save yourself the trip, fuel and a ticket and stay away from this area. Possibly in the future it will be low-key enough to visit again.
    Better test your mettle on the High Steel Bridge, that stands 420 feet above the South Fork of the Skokomish River and is quite impressive to stand on. With guardrails, looking over the bridge is extremely safe, though anyone should use caution while looking over the edge. Staring down over 400 feet, look for the narrow falls with a drop of about 125 feet. It is best viewed in winter and early spring when the small watershed above has sufficient runoff to deliver to the falls. It may be running sparsely, or near dry, by early summer into the early fall before rains restore the flow.
    Rumored to be the highest bridge build for the US rail line, the easy access and incredibly views from the High Steel Bridge make it a great quick stop for visitors of all ages and abilities.

    LOCATION
    Latitude : 47.3679
    Longitude : - 123.2816
    South Fork Skokomish River 9.8 miles from US Highway 101 north of Shelton.

    Getting there:
    From Hwy 101 north of Shelton, take the Skokomish Valley Road for five miles to FS Road #23. Go 2.4 miles to FS Road #2340, and follow it for another 2.4 miles. Park on either end of the narrow bridge crossing the gorge.
    Photo and video were taken by iPhone 6s. Video created with iMovie.
    Enjoy traveling with us!
    Grab the idea of a small day trip in Seattle neighborhood - check out my other video at my YouTube Chanel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcD78uHbhahgVB1UOU1sAVw?view_as=subscriber!

    Music: Cumbia No Frills Faster by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
    Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100275
    Artist: http://incompetech.com/
    12507 Views
  • Travis Couture for WA Senate - Tourism, Economic Development and the Environment

    Travis Couture outlines environmental issues within Washington's 35th District which includes parts of the Olympic Peninsula, Hood Canal and South Puget Sound (South Kitsap, North Thurston, and Mason Counties). Washington is the only state in the US that has zero state funding for tourism. It was cut completely during the economic downturn, now it's up to local businesses. My opponent as county commissioner cut funding to Mason County's 20 beautiful parks by $600k ($1.2 million total including matching federal grant funds lost) to pay down the Belfair sewer debt. He has even proposed a similar plan to take the Mason County lodging tax, which is the only fund for promoting county fairs and festivals, and using it to pay for county expenses. We need to make tourism more of a priority, not less.
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  • High Steel Bridge Spanning the Skokomish River in Washington State [HD]

    High Steel Bridge is a truss arch bridge that spans the south fork of the Skokomish River on Forest Service road #2202 near the city of Shelton, Washington in Mason County, Washington. The High Steel Bridge was the second of two large steel arches to be erected by the Simpson Logging Company on Forest Service land in 1929. These bridges carried a single railroad track across formidable chasms opening up expansive tracts of previously inaccessible timber on the Olympic Peninsula.

    You can read more about the bridge here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Steel_Bridge

    This video was shot using a 3dr Solo Smart Drone with a GoPro Hero 4 Black. Background music played by Gabriella Quevedo.
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  • High Steel Bridge See details below

    High Steel Bridge
    Coordinates 47°22′05″N 123°16′48″WCoordinates: 47°22′05″N 123°16′48″W
    Carries Passenger vehicles and logging trucks
    Crosses South fork, Skokomish River
    Locale Mason County, Washington
    Official name Forest Service Road 2202
    Maintained by United States Forest Service
    Characteristics
    Design Truss arch
    Material Steel
    Total length 685 ft (209 m)[1]
    Height 375 ft (114 m)[1]

    High Steel Bridge is a truss arch bridge that spans the south fork of the Skokomish River on Forest Service road #2202 near the city of Shelton, Washington in Mason County, Washington. The High Steel Bridge was the second of two large steel arches to be erected by the Simpson Logging Company on Forest Service land in 1929. These bridges carried a single railroad track across formidable chasms opening up expansive tracts of previously inaccessible timber on the Olympic Peninsula.

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    Please watch: "Silence Celebration 3 Games 1 Day"
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  • Visit PUD 3 at the Mason Area Fair 2012

    Mason County PUD No. 3 invites you to the PUD booth at the Mason Area Fair July 27-29, 2012.

    PUD 3 employees Joel Myer, Mike Dahman, Lynn Harvey, and Justin Holzgrove provide a preview of what fair attendees can expect at the PUD booth this year.

    The Mason Area Fair is on Highway 101 just north of Shelton. Learn more by visiting the fair's website: http://www.masoncountyfair.org/fair.html
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  • Part 2 High Steel Bridge-Flying Log WA state

    High Steel Bridge is a historic truss arch bridge that spans the south fork of the Skokomish River in Mason County in Shelton, Washington State. It was built in 1929 by Simpson Logging Company as part of a logging railroad. 420 ft above South Fork Skokomish river on High Steel Bridge with its 750 tons of steel spanning 685 ft. Campgrounds are nearby like Brown Creek. Please subscribe thank you.
    11215 Views
  • Vance Creek Bridge

    The Vance Creek Bridge is an arch bridge in the Satsop Hills of Mason County, Washington that was built for a logging railroad owned by the Simpson Logging Company in 1929. At 347 feet (106 m) in height, it is the second-highest railroad arch in the United States after the nearby High Steel Bridge
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